Lynsey Addario’s “A Photographer’s Life of Love and War”

Posted on May 10 by SEASONS Magazine

courtesy of Lynsey Addario.

“Veiled Rebellion,” courtesy of Lynsey Addario.

UCSB Arts Lectures presents world renowned photojournalist Lynsey Addario. Addario will deliver a National Geographic Live multimedia presentation, A Photographer’s Life of Love and War on Saturday, May 13 at 3 p.m. at UCSB Campbell Hall. Books will be available for purchase and signing at the event.

Lynsey Addario is a MacArthur fellow and a courageous photojournalist who documents humanitarian crises for National GeographicTime magazine and The New York Times. Some of her most recent work includes reports about the plight of Syrian refugees, the ISIS push into Iraq and maternal mortality in Sierra Leone. Addario has been listed among Newsweek’s 15o Fearless Women. On the frontlines of reporting Addario has been kidnapped twice—once in Iraq in 2004 and in Libya in 2011. She retells these life altering experiences in her memoir It’s What I Do: A Photographer’s Life of Love and War, currently being adapted into a Steven Spielberg film starring Jennifer Lawrence.

Doctors without Borders staff handles a food distribution on behalf of WFP, and conduct an ambulatory therpeutic feeding program for severely malnourished children in the village of Mayan, in Turkana, Kenya, August 15, 2011. The horn of Africa is suffering one of the worst droughts in years, displacing thousands, and killing others through severe malnutrition. In response to the increasing severity of the situation MSF is operating an emergency nutrition intervention in Turkana. Courtesy of Lynsey Addario.

Doctors without Borders staff handles a food distribution on behalf of WFP, and conduct an ambulatory therapeutic feeding program for severely malnourished children in the village of Mayan, in Turkana, Kenya, August 15, 2011. The horn of Africa is suffering one of the worst droughts in years, displacing thousands, and killing others through severe malnutrition. In response to the increasing severity of the situation, MSF is operating an emergency nutrition intervention in Turkana. Courtesy of Lynsey Addario.

Addario uses powerful and evocative images to illustrate a decade of war and strife. This presentation will not only show photos, it will include the stories of how living through these moments shaped her life. Addario’s presentation brings the audience to the front lines of geopolitical and human rights issues in the world. She will share the risks she took to bring these photos back with her.

Addario began her professional career in photography in 1996 with very little formal training in the medium. She traveled to Afghanistan in 2000 to document life under the Taliban regime. Since then. she has returned to Afghanistan several times and covered conflicts in Iraq, Lebanon, Darfur, the Democratic Republic of the Congo and Libya where she was among four New York Times journalist who were kidnapped in 2011. Most recently her work has focused on the Syrian refugee crisis, the rise of ISIS in Iraq, the civil war in South Sudan and the flow of African and Middle Eastern migrants into Sicily.

Afghan women police are trained at a firing range by Italian Caribinieri outside of Kabul, Afghanistan, April 13, 2010. Few Afghan women train to be police in the country, mostly because of cultural and familial restrictions, and many of these women are widows, and the breadwinners for their families. Out of the 26 women initially signed up for training, only 16 have gone through with the course. Courtesy of Lynsey Addario.

Afghan women police are trained at a firing range by Italian Carabinieri outside of Kabul, Afghanistan, April 13, 2010. Few Afghan women train to be police in the country, mostly because of cultural and familial restrictions, and many of these women are widows and the breadwinners for their families. Out of the 26 women initially signed up for training, only 16 have gone through with the course. Courtesy of Lynsey Addario.

Throughout her career, Addario has been the recipient of many prestigious awards. She received the Overseas Press Club’s Oliver Rebbot award for her series “Veiled Rebellion: Afghan Women,” she was part of the New York Times team honored with the 2009 Pulitzer Prize for International Reporting “for its masterful, groundbreaking coverage of America’s deepening military and political challenges in Afghanistan and Pakistan.” In 2015, American Photo magazine named Addario as one of the five most influential photographers of the past 25 years, for changing the way we see world conflict.

For more information, visit artsandlectures.ucsb.edu or call 805/893-3535.

—Lauren Bennett

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